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Holiday Gifts

 
Eames Hang-it-all
Eames Hang-It-All
In the mid-1940s, Charles and Ray Eames began designing toys and furniture for children, including molded plywood animals, colorful building blocks and whimsical masks. “We have to take pleasure seriously,” said Charles Eames, and the Hang-It-All (1953) is an example of this mantra. Instead of simple hooks, the brightly colored wooden balls of the Eames Hang It All coat rack are aimed at encouraging children, both young and old, to literally hang up all their things.
Made with a sturdy steel frame and solid wood balls, this design was created using the same technique for simultaneously welding wires that the Eameses developed for their low tables and wire chairs. This design was created with the same careful attention to detail that one is accustomed to seeing in all Eames furniture and products.
In addition to the original combination of multicolored balls and white frame, the Hang-It-All is now available in several color options so you can find the bold or mellow hue that works for you.
This is the authentic Hang-It-All by Herman Miller. Eames is a licensed trademark of Herman Miller. Made in U.S.A.

 

Eames Walnut Stools
Eames Walnut Stools
At the time it was built in 1959, the Time-Life Building was the largest slab-formed skyscraper in New York. It was a modern marvel, featuring an ultra-modern lobby with murals by Joseph Albers and Fritz Glarner. In 1960, Ray Eames was asked to design occasional pieces for that lobby to accompany chairs designed by her husband, Charles. The space required a durable and versatile stool that could be used as a seating perch or as a side table to rest a cup of coffee or tea. These stools may seem sculptural, but Ray Eames said the biggest challenge was making the concave surface deep enough to serve as a comfortable seat, but not so deep that it couldn’t support a hot beverage. The walnut stools became her favorite seats and were scattered all over the Pacific Palisades home she shared with Charles.
The stools come in three different versions. The middle sections differ between each model, but the tops and bottoms are the same and can be used on either end.

 

Nelson Bubble Lamps
Nelson Bubble Lamps
An assortment of lights in various spherical silhouettes, the Nelson Bubble Lamps add a touch of softness and luminosity to interiors. Designed by George Nelson in 1952, these elegant fixtures are fashioned from a sturdy, lightweight steel frame yet have a delicate, floating quality, whether in ceiling-hung, floor, table, or wall-mounted variations.
Nelson was inspired by a set of silk-covered Swedish hanging lamps that he wanted to acquire for his office, but he found the price to be prohibitive. An ingenious and resourceful designer, he went on to create the first set of Nelson Bubble Lamps using a translucent white plastic spray, a technique developed by the U.S. military at the time. Nelson drew from elemental, organic shapes in making variations like the Apple Bubble Pendant, the Pear Wall Sconce, the Lotus Table Lamp, and the Saucer Pendant Lamp, among others.

 

Nelson Fireplace Set
Nelson Fireplace Set
More than a set of useful accessories to tend your fireplace, George Nelson’s Fireplace Tool Set, designed in 1951, exemplify Nelson's ability to create objects that possess a sense of timelessness through their inventiveness and quality.
The set of tools includes a poker, shovel, brush and floor stand. Originally produced using cast iron with polished birch handles, these pieces have been updated for 2017 and are now available in durable powder-coated steel with walnut handles.
Nelson Firewood Caddy
The iconic Mid-Century modern Firewood Caddy compliments the Nelson Fireplace tool set.
It is far more than just an accent piece to compliment any modern fireplace, this piece envelops Nelson's idea to provide designs that are classic and ageless through originality. The Nelson Firewood Caddy is an excellent accessory fit for storing extra wood in the house or acts as a decor piece giving it a touch of detail to any modern living room space. When this piece was originally introduced it was crafted in cast iron with polished birch wood details but has now been updated to a more modern style. The firewood Caddy is made of a steel frame in a powder-coated finish with a canvas sling and solid walnut wood fasteners

 

Finn Juhl
Finn Juhl Essence and Turning Tray
FJ Essence Tea Set illuminates the unique aesthetics of Finn Juhl. The crisp white and hand glazed surface curvatures into those well-known organic shapes that have made Finn Juhl famous on an international level. The lean design combined with the clear white porcelain will be suitable on any occasion. Originally Finn Juhl designed FJ Essence in 1952 but it never went into production. Now, more than 60 years after, ARCHITECTMADE can finally invite you to enjoy a cup of tea with Finn Juhl
The FJ Turning Tray was designed in 1956 by Finn Juhl, bearing his trademark curved teak frame and precise corner joints. Made without handle bars, the tray’s curvature allows space for all sizes of hands, from child to adult, to pick it up. Designed as dual-sided, the Turning Tray boasts two glossy laminate sides held together by carefully crafted corner joints.
Finn Juhl Bowl
The FJ Bowl is the smallest of the sought-after teakwood bowl series that Finn Juhl designed in 1951. It features the characteristic blend of organic shapes and balance between wood, form and geometric measurements that made Juhl famous. By contrasting the undulating pattern of the teakwood with the rim, Juhl uses design to further reveal the natural properties of the material at hand: depending on what angle you look at it from, the bowl changes shape, creating new relationships at every turn while slowly growing on you
Finn Juhl Clock
The FJ Clock was designed as a part of the interior of the New York United Nation Trusteeship Council Chamber in 1950 and it captures the essence of Juhl’s design aesthetic. The circular shape complementing the natural qualities of the teak wood and the numberless aluminum dial captures his flair for clever minimalism.

 

PK Bowl Series
PK Bowl Series
In 1963, Poul Kjærholm designed the Fredericia Town Hall and created PK-600, a large, 550 lb black marble bowl. This form, part sculpture, part functional object, was welcomed with remarkable public success.
In response, Kjærholm designed its offspring, the PK-Bowl, so that everybody could enjoy it as a part of their own household. Made of granite, the PK-Bowl is a stark contrast between square and round as well as the smooth inside and rough outside symbolizing the contrast between the feminine and masculine.
PK-Marble is a sculptural piece related to Poul Kjærholms PK-600 and PK-Bowl. It elegantly combines the timeless Nero Marquina marble used for the PK-600 with the size of the granite PK-Bowl. Its smooth and rounded inner black marble surface softly reflects incoming light, adding contrasts to the raw and unpolished exterior
PK-Minib> consists of two sculptural bowls made of black Nero Marquina marble and white Volakas marble. The two bowls are related to the PK-600, PK-Bowl and PK-Marble, which Poul Kjærholm made in 1963. As their predecessors, PK-Mini embraces contrasts between black and white; between the gracefully curved veins and the solid stone. It highlights the contrast between the soft shaped interior and the raw, rugged exterior.

 

Ikebana Vases
Ikebana Vases
Ikebana’ is Japanese for making flowers live and is used to describe the art of arranging flowers. The beautiful vase by Jamie Hayon is true to the spirit of Ikebana. The vase is designed to honor and enjoy the whole flower and not just the crown. The vases are made of clear blown glass with brass inserts.

 

Girard Wooden Dolls
Girard Wooden Dolls
Alongside Charles and Ray Eames as well as George Nelson, Alexander Girard was one of the decisive figures in post-War American design. The focus of his broad oeuvre was on textile design, and a key source of inspiration for him was his passion for the popular art of South America, Asia and East Europe. The Wooden Dolls, part decorative object and part toy, were created for his own home in Santa Fe and made himself. "Toys," said Alexander Girard, "represent a microcosm of man's world and dreams; they exhibit fantasy, imagination, humor and love." The painted surfaces of these semi-abstract, sculptural figures show aesthetic elements from Central America as well as Eastern Europe and Italy.
Designed in 1952, the Wooden Dolls are a large family of wooden figures representing human and animal characters. Precisely replicated down to the last detail, the many different Wooden Dolls are still fabricated and painted by hand today. Each wooden figure, a unique, individual product, truly one of a kind is delivered with a brochure in a high-quality, printed wooden box.

 

Eames Elephant
Eames Elephant
Almost no other animal enjoys such popularity as the elephant. Admired for its majestic size and loved for its proverbial good humor, it is part of our everyday experience as a child’s cuddly toy, a storybook character and a majestic creature. Charles and Ray Eames also succumbed to their charms and in 1945 designed a toy elephant made of plywood. However, it never made it into mass production and only 2 prototypes were developed.
In 2007, Vitra introduced a limited edition Plywood Elephant. Shortly afterwards, the Eames Elephant was launched in plastic, making it available to the target group for which it was originally intended: children
In 2017, a plywood version of the legendary Eames Elephant was introduced. Harkening back to the original design, this sculptural decorative figure has a high-quality face veneer in American Cherry. Also in 2017, a smaller version with an identical scaled down design was introduced. This smaller version offered in the same colored plastic as it’s larger cousins.

 

Eames House Bird
Eames House Bird
The small decorative black house bird is considered one of the most famous Eames pieces, even though it wasn't designed by Eames at all. Charles and Ray Eames collected numerous objects from their travels. The figure of a black wooden bird, an object of American folk art from the Appalachian Mountains, has stood in the center of their living room for over fifty years. The bird was actually the creation of Charles and Edna Perdew. In the 1930’s, the husband and wife team from Henry, Illinois, dedicated themselves to carving and painting bird decoys for hunters. The simple black bird Perdew carved around 1910 became a highly sought-after model, primarily for its minimal shape and dark color. The wooden bird became a center piece of the Eames living room and soon started to make an appearance in many of their product photo-shoots
Vitra started reproducing the House Bird in 2008 by creating 3D scans of the original. However, unlike Perdew's versions, which were mostly carved out of pine, the Vitra version is made of solid alder with a black lacquer finish and steel wire legs. In 2018, Vitra introduced a solid walnut version of the house bird with a clear lacquer finish.
Its reappearance has brought the little black bird back to many mid-century inspired homes, where it often perches on top of furniture, elegant and unobtrusive at the same time.

 

Man Ray Chess Set & Board
Man Ray Chess Set & Board
This design was inspired by Man Ray's lifelong friendship with avid chess player and fellow artist Marcel Duchamp. This re-edition of the 1920s Wooden Chess Set is based on the original 1920 Man Ray Wooden Chess Set in the Metropolitan Museum of Art and was the inspiration for a larger silver version in the MoMA collection. In this set, Man Ray translates traditional chess pieces into pure geometric forms.

 

Handle Vase
Handle Vase
Handle Vase is designed by the Danish architect Eva Harlou. The Handle Vase offers an original yet functional way of arranging flowers and easily set a beautiful table.
The vase is hand blown in borosilicate glass and rests elegantly on a foot of FSC certified oak that allows to play with positioning of the flowers. The handle further allows the vase to hang in displays and decorative setups. Whether it be at the dining room table or set in the living room side table, the handle vase will enhance any room its placed in.
Founded in 2006 by Henrik Marstrand, Mater is a Danish lighting and furniture brand with a highly ethical approach to design. As a way to improve the environmental and social impacts of production, Mater sums up their company mission in three words: Design, craftsmanship and ethics. Using responsibly sourced materials to create their timeless designs, Mater not only strives to preserve traditional techniques, but takes care to create a cooperative environment between designers and artisans both in Denmark and abroad.

 

QLOCKTWO
QLOCKTWO
With QLOCKTWO, you'll stop and look at time in a different way. The typographical display combines the moment with the written word and turns it into a statement. "It is half past seven." This meticulous German engineered word clock can be displayed as a wall clock or freestanding table or desktop clock. The front cover of the QLOCKTWO attaches with magnets for a seamless display and easily interchangeable facade. Front covers come in brushed stainless steel, polished synthetic glass in seven colors and 15 different languages. This is a truly unique and interesting way to use a timepiece as an art piece, without losing any functionality.
QLOCKTWO, the product of design team, Biegert & Funk.

 

Flyte
Flyte
Set the Lightbulb Free! A levitating light bulb that hovers by magnetic levitation and is powered through the air. Designed in Sweden, the FLYTE base is made of sustainably sourced walnut and uses an energy efficient LED rated at about 50,000 hours. That's equivalent to 12 hours of usage a day for 11 years.

 

 

 


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Showroom Information

9020 West Olympic Boulevard, Beverly Hills CA 90211
T. 310.274.7243 / F. 310.274.5626 / info@julesseltzer.com
Hours: Weekdays 9 - 5 / Saturdays 11 - 5